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'll be talking foreign policy with national security adviser dr. brzezinski. keep it right here on "morning joe." music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. bp has paid overthe people of bp twenty-threeitment to the gulf. billion dollars to
paid too little attention to this changing of the guard. what will their foreign policy look like? i have to great guests to shed light on all of that. welcome. liz. you have a very tough blog posting on the excellent counsel on foreign relations website which you say china's 18th party congress was a heartbreaker. it was a triumph of the conservative party. the candidate will the strongest credentials were left high and high. they took their place among the top seven. you see this as a real kind of reinstitution of a hard line conservative group. >> i do. i think this was a disappointing outcome from the 18th party congress. if you look at this leadership group they bring a wealth of experience to the table. collectively these seven men have governed roughly half the provinces. a number of them do have experience at the national level with the economy or political arena but by in large they are distinguish eed by their lack o distinction. none of them have been associated with an innovative program or policy reform on the economic or policy front. i think the fear in beijing is they
we sort of to set politics and issues aside. she bring as 21st century approach to foreign policy. one that is in step with president obama. she also has a great deal of passion for human rights and human dignity. what john kerry has passion for nobody is really sure. he is kind of a vanilla buy. she understands issues of poverty and pandemic and how though pray into national security and foreign policy. jon: on the other hand, senator mccain says, john kerry came within a whisker of being president of the united states, angela. senator mccain went on to say this, i would love to hear him make necessary case. i don't have anything in thinks background like the tragedy in gaziano that would make me carefully examine the situation. >> it is doing susan rice. if kerry is the nominee he would have smooth sailing through. in washington these are friends behind the scenes. if susan rice is nominee we'll have partisan politics. we have the liberal mainstream media already bashing republicans, some calling them racists and sexist in the fact they won't support susan rise because the fact
's a problem with the photo op foreign policy with few real accomplishments and it's becoming more apparent to people around the world. >> gregg: we also supply aid to the palestinians, humanitarian aid. should that be reconsidered most recent actions against israel? >> with any aid you have to ask what it is doing, what goal is it advancing? we keep harping on both parties but seemingly hard the other israelis that we need to come to some sort of negotiation, get to the table have an agreement, petition agreement. i think we need to step back and realize the political factors in place for an agreement. if you have gaza run by hamas, starting wars with israel whenever you turn your back it's not going to lead to an agreement. we should be focusing on money and state on changing those political factors rather than writing these checks left and right. >> gregg: how do we can changes those political factors and what is the possibility in the near or distant future there could be a reconciliation and on the other hand gaza the palestinians there controlled by what is essentially a terrorist gro
nation that enacted democratic refo freed the most famous dissident it marked unambiguous foreign policy triumph for mr. obama and his secretary of state. the most well traveled in modern times. >> i could not be more grateful, not only for your service, hillary, but also for the powerful message that you send. >> but the obama administration no less than its preds so sors has been thoroughly vexed by the middle east, with the syrian regime quashing a two-year uprising that killed more than 30,000 people. where iran despite tough sanctions on the energy sector marches toward a nuclear weapons capability. and where the arab-israeli conflict festers, despite lofty talk from washington early on. >> today you will see an example of the kind of robust diplomacy that the president intends to pursue. >> clinton helped broker this month's truce between hamas and israel but ties with jerusalem frayed since 2009 and other danger spots such as north korea are no less dangerous than they were four years ago. >> she has a small legacy with burma, a positive. but she has a legacy with libya which is a
and advisors are headed for the exits. who are the replacement and what impact on the foreign policy. doug has more for us in washington. >> foremost is who will replace hillary clinton as secretary of state? the white house signaled that un ambassador susan rice will be the choice . this week, the president voiced ut most confidence in her. >> susan rice is extraordinary . couldn't be prouder of a job done. >> also this week another republican senator expressed major doubts about rice not only about the bengazi terrorist attack but because of the africa section during the terrorist attack in the embassy in kenya when they pled for better security. susan collins teled the message to the administration about the secretary of state opening. >> i think john kerry would be an excellent appointment and easily confirmed by the colleagues. >> there are other key cabinet picks. secretary of the defense will have to contend with a destabilized middle east and rising threats from asia when big defense cuts are anticipated. former republican chuck ha gel of nebraska and ashton carter and michelle florino
simes, president of the center for the national interest, a foreign policy think tank. and steven heydemann, a senior adviser for middle east initiatives at the united states institute of peace. he's worked with the syrian opposition on the challenges ahead once the assad regime falls. steve, to you first. what do you understand the situation on the ground to be right now in syria? >> we have seen in the past month a significant shift in the momentum of events on the ground. we have seen the opposition increase the effectiveness of its tactics. it has acquired weapons that have permitted it to challenge the regime much more effectively across a broad range of fronts ranging from the south of syria to damascus to the north, and we're seeing this reflected in the regime's response to the opposition including some of the activities surrounding movement of chemical weapons. we don't know exactly what's at stake but part of the speculation is that they're putting themselves into a position in which they could create a defensive zone if it turns out to they're unable to defend damascus
's foreign policy and seldom the case a achievement or error by one of them endures forever. analysts say secretary clinton brought undeniable star power to her role as chief diplomat and used her unique status on the world stage and global rolodex to advance issues of concern to her. she is included gender equality, the environment, technology and social media and steering of resources to her department. yet on the great foreign policy challenge of her time clinton can point to only limited progress of kind could be expected in the post 9/11 world where tough sanctions on iran's oil and gas sector failed to check that regime's march towards nuclear weapon. where change in leadership in north korea produced know change in that rogue state's behavior and upheaval's of the arab spring hardly dampened the volatility of the middle east. one analyst who worked for six secretaries of state told fox news, hillary clinton will not enter the secretary of states hall of fame, he argues, her boss kept mrs. clinton on a short leash. >> issues regarding peace, war, iraq being afghanistan, war against
the fight with john tower in the first term. not a great way to start it. foreign policy is usually the time presidents get tripped up. it happened with truman and rgan and bush in iraq. foreign policy surprises can derail a second term. the president will have to be careful of benghazi. >> gretchen: you would think if they were concerned about legacy they would do things they know they can control. nick, thank you for your thoughts. >> thank you. >> gretchen: she should have died, the cheerleader who fell 40 feet from a window . he used the gun to save his boss. how was he rewarded? he was fired. happy birthday to johnnie resneck of the goo-goo dolls. he's 47. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> now that the election is over i am getting the impression that president obama is getting a little cocky. >> working to get public support for the tax and spending proposal. president obama answered questions on twitter. how will you stop us from going over the fiscal cliff and will it involve significant deficit reduction. the president said i thought twitter was supposed to be fun. where are all of the crazy video. tw
of the treasury, he was deputy secretary during president bush and happened to be a senior foreign policy ambassador to germany and is one of the very few people who synthesizes the economic and national security in such a holistic way. his dad was a famous democrat who was one of the reasons i moved to washington, really great to have bob here. to michael porter's right ahead douglas holtz-eakin iran the congressional budget office and is a distinguished economist. he was john mccain's economic adviser in the first campaign. he is now running the american action forum. he is one of the best hot shots on fiscal issues but does it kindly and then we have steve case. i wanted to give him chairmanship of the jobs council, jeff immelt had that but not for long. steve case, one of the founders and chairman of aol, he chairs the entrepreneurship council, chairman of revolution, very tied up in trying to think about what are the spark the drive innovation, creativity, how do you drive young people here. you have been involved in a major study, u.s. competitive project at harvard business school.
article in foreign policy recently. has been was a china adviser to mitt romney. he now heads the university of chicago. but he basically wrote about the sort of two chinas or to the ages. he said there's sort of a doctor jekyll and mr. hide that's evolving to a doctor jekyll, which is the nicer of the two is the economic issue. the dr. height is the strategic asia, is the security agent. if you look at the economic asia there's heavy amounts of interdependence, everybody is investigating each other. $19 billion in regional trade which includes india. if you look at the security asia, national entity, orders dispute, historical grievances just are driving things apart and you're seeing real impact on these. in the has its own problems in the region across china region across china. region across chandigarh on the border dispute. if you look at this is something that you want to be deeply engaged in or do you look at this is basically something that you can ride along and freeload and let america and canada and japan handled? >> steve, your question -- >> i'm and freeload, by t
. that is the bipartisan tradition we need more of in washington, especially on foreign policy. as you prepare to leave the senate you love, i think i speak on behalf of everybody here and millions of people across the country when i say your legacy will endure in a safer and more secure world and a safer and more secure america. we pray this nation produces more leaders with your sense of decency and stability and integrity. we are grateful to you. thank you very much. [applause] i will point out it was the coup took me on my first foreign trip as a senator to russia, ukraine, and we were there to see the cooperative production program in action. the first thing i learned is when dick travels overseas, it is not a duncan. -- junkin. we did not stop and look at beautiful sights and lounge around. he wore out every 25-year-old staffoer. what you also learn is dick -- the more remote a place is, the more obscure the facility is, the bigger a rock star dick is. [laughter] they love him. i remember walking through one facility. i leaned in for a closer look. they said, do not touch that orange stuff. at an
. what can our current president of the united states learn from churchhill's foreign policy? >> one thing churchhill would not believe in leading from behind. he believed in telling the facts and then rallying the people around the facts. >> steve: yeah. >> and what he can learn in this book, not only his many prophecies was proved to be true. but that the way he arrived at these predictions. that process is a premer for presidential leadership. >> steve: you think that it a big mistake for president obama in his first term to return that famous bust of churchhill to the british and took it out of the white house. >> well he did it, yes. when it went there the night before. yes, he was awful rejecting the wisdom of churchhill he could listen to churchhill he would say the important thing is not to be popular, but to be respected. and churchhill did that. he told the people the truth. that's the reason he was a great prophet not only did he know history but he had the courage to deliver the unvarnished facts unlike spineless politician or burrcrats. >> steve: maybe the president coul
by 2020. huge implications for foreign policy and how we do business. it's really been an interesting development in the oil patch. >> it will be really nice to talk about something other than the fiscal cliff. i will say that. >> jobs. that's right. >> 25 minutes past the hour. the republican party needs some new younger blood say some pundits. are these the new leaders of the gop, paul ryan, marco rubio, could they already be on the campaign trail? bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management to provide a better benefits package... oahhh! [ male announcer ] it made a big splash with the employees. [ duck yelling ] [ male announcer ] find out more at... [ duck ] aflac! [ male announcer ] ...forbusiness.com. ♪ ha ha! progresso. in what world do potatoes, bacon and cheese add up to 100 calories? your world. ♪ [ whispers ] real bacon... creamy cheese... 100 calories... [ chef ] ma'am [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup.
was offering in terms of economic direction, foreign policy direction. had to reflect on the road we've just traveled in the last four years and as voters do, they spent a lot of time thinking about the future. so in the next four years who can i trust on the economy, on social issues and foreign policy. and we live in a country that is even pli divided politically and we have close elections. our victory in 2008 was a landslide. it was clear this election was going to be closer, fwiven the economy and divisions in the country. with that being said, we still won electoral college, maybe not a landslide but a clear majority. our popular vote is 3% which is a healthy margin. and i think the reason we won is people understood where we had been economically. all of you have lived through the recession. this is not something that is an academic theory. everyone painfully lived through the recession. we are beginning to recover from that. the economy has created jobs over 5 fnt 5 million jobs which our economy is far too week but the electorate said i'm beginning to feel some progress. does that m
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)